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UBER Plans Air Taxi Services with NASA and Picks Two American Cities for Tests

UBER Plans Air Taxi Services with NASA and Picks Two American Cities for Tests

In recent conference in Portugal, Uber product director picks Los Angeles and Dallas as the first two cities to host the fleet of air transportation vehicles of its company of shared trip services. This will include small automated electric airplanes with spinning propellers mounted to their wings known as vertical take-off and landing vehicles – or VTOLs. They have the capacity to take off from high buildings, like a helicopter. They will respond to an UberAir app in synchrony with an air traffic control system developed in partnership with NASA.

Uber hopes L. A. Residents to be heavily using flying vehicles when the city hosts the 2028 Olympic Games. This “technology will allow LA residents to literally fly over the city's historically bad traffic, giving them time back to use in far more productive ways”, says Jeff Holden. "At scale, we expect UberAir will perform tens of thousands of flights each day across the city".

Uber signed a contract with NASA to develop an air traffic system for low speed non-manned vehicles which Uber hopes to start testing it in 2020, according to CNBC.

"UberAir will be performing far more flights on a daily basis than it has ever been done before. Doing this safely and efficiently is going to require a foundational change in airspace management technologies," says Holden, Uber director of product.

The company hired Mark Moore, a long time NASA engineer to work in the project. He said he plans to add air taxis lines to Dallas-Fort Worth airport and Dubai until 2020.  The company said that vehicles that operate on shared trips will have a lot of benefits, including less traffic jams on the road, faster trips, silent operation and less pollution.

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